Mount Holly Cemetery Association

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Mount Holly Newsletter

Issue 31 Spring 2014

Iconography or Symbolism in Mount Holly

By Marianne Ligon

Whether we are aware or not, we use symbols every day. When we see a red octagon sign at the end of the street, we know to stop. The golden arches are recognized world-wide as a place for hamburgers and fries. And, the stick man or stick woman guides us to the appropriate restroom everywhere. Most people know the cross as a symbol of Christianity and the Star of David as one for Judaism, but few know the fern frond is a symbol for sincerity or sorrow and the scallop shell symbolizes a journey or pilgrimage.

Cemeteries house a wealth of symbols and iconography. Not only are they numerous styles of crosses: the Western, Latin, Celtic, Maltese, but some even are mingled with flowers and vines. Ivy may represent memory, friendship, fidelity as well as immortality or eternal life as it is always green. The morning glory represents resurrection, mourning, youth or brevity of life. The palm is a symbol of spiritual victory, the rose of love, beauty, hope and the lily for innocence and purity. Religious art and nature are only a few of the types of ornamentation found in cemeteries.

Architectural features and items from a daily life are visible on some markers. A broken column means a life cut short. Often a column will have a drape or pall over it representing sorrow or mourning. An obelisk is one of the oldest forms of symbols dating to the Egyptian for whom it represented the ray of the sun. For them the sun symbolized immortality. A scroll symbolizes a life as does an open book. An urn is a Greek symbol of mourning and may even have a pall on it or a flame (eternity) or additional meaning. There is even evidence of vocations and secret societies on markers. A caduceus may appear on the marker of a doctor, musical notes for a musician, and scales for a lawyer. Woodmen of the world often have a marker in the shape of a tree trunk. Odd Fellows would have a chain and Masons an all seeing eye or the square and compass.

There is so more to read than the names and dates on the markers of Mount Holly. Call for a tour or spend a few extra minutes studying the symbols and learn to read the stones. There is a story to be had.
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MOUNT HOLLY CEMETERY ASSOCIATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS

President: Sissy McDade Clinton

Vice President: Sybil Jordan Hampton

Secretary: Anne Elizabeth Orsi

Treasurer: Janis Parham Thibault

Assist.Treasurer: Allison Dyke Pickell

Newsletter: Susan Terry Borné

Matilda Wynne Buchanan

Carolynn Conway Coleman

Frances Anderson Cranford

Mary Penick Hodges

Mary Sue Horner Jacobs

Marianne Wynne Ligon

Nancy Nixon McDonough

Robin Nichols Orsi

Nancy Peay Phillips

Elise Dietz Siegler

Martha Norman Sowell

Kay Brakefield Tatum

Gladys Shackelford Whitney

 

EMERITA MEMBERS

Sue Walsh Campbell

Marion Jennings Cockrill

Patricia Ellis Cromwell

Trudie Watkins Cromwell

Barbara Aker Darragh

Marjem Jackson Gill

Sheila Watkins Mehaffy

Elizabeth Kilbury Terry

Kathleen Sewell Worthen

Mary Fletcher Worthen
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COLUMBARIUM SPACES AVAILABLE
Call Sexton Steve Adams at 501-376-1843 for more information
*information also available on this website.

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WE LOOK FORWARD TO A WONDERFUL YEAR AT MOUNT HOLLY

Spring is around the corner and will bring our Annual Picnic on April 27th, a fun-filled afternoon offering good food, drinks, friends, and most importantly our silent auction, where attendees may bid on a variety of parties, events, and unique products.

Mount Holly has an incredible board, whose members donate their time, experience, and talent to all of our projects. Speaking of our Board, we send a very special thank you to Betty Terry, who is going Emerita after many years of service. We will miss her knowledge of the history of Mount Holly and seeing her at our meetings. She is always welcome at board meetings and events.

It is with sadness that I mention the death of Sybil F. Crawford. Sybil wrote the sesquicentennial history of Mount Holly Cemetery in 1993. She died February 20, 2014 and will be interred at Mount Holly at a later date.

We are grateful for support from our donors, who help keep Mount Holly beautiful. There is always a need for repairs, gardening, and other work necessary to maintain the grounds. Steve Adams, our Sexton, whom Mount Holly could not do without, is responsible for maintaining the beauty that Mount Holly is known for. We must also give credit to our wonderful group of Master Gardeners, who work hard to plant flowerbeds and cradles and around the fountain. By late April, when we have the Annual Picnic, everything will be in bloom, reminding us of what a special place Mount Holly is.

The continued donations by our supporters and by our board members are the necessary resources that make it possible for Mount Holly to maintain its unique status and remain at its best. Thank you to all of our friends; we look forward to seeing everyone at the Annual Picnic!

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MOUNT HOLLY'S FRIENDS, THE QUESTERS

Six grants from the International Questers have been used to restore five major items at Mount Holly Cemetery including the Boyle Fountain, a cast iron bench, two separate grants for the restoration of a cast iron fence around the Samuel Calhoun Roane burial site, restoration of the Sullivan monument and the restoration of the dangerously leaning Samuel Adams obelisk. All Questers grants for Mount Holly have totaled $11,856. Thank you Questers!

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Interments

Mary Grace Longnecker Allen

August, 19, 2013

Father Theodore Alfred Bessette

January 27, 2014

Norma Regina Bisgood

January 4, 2014

Gloria Lee Miller Counts

August 6, 2013

Carol Ann Cragar

December 2, 2013

Patricia Anne Fordyce

July 1, 2013

Harold James Hamilton

November 4, 2013

Jane Cole Hamilton

November 4, 2013

Steve Todd Laing

May 15, 2013

Robert Cunningham Lowry

January 10, 2014

Benjamin Franklin Mackey, Jr.

March 25, 2013

Charles Harvey Martin

October 9, 2013

Susan Perkins Miller

June 3, 2013

James William Parins

November 22, 2013

Barbara Benton Patty

February 28, 2014

Ray Patterson Price

April 26, 2013

Paul E. Pyle, Jr.

May 31, 2013

Constance Brodnax Smith

July 3, 2013

James Edward Taylor

January 2, 2014

Gail Deveny Wardlaw

November 22, 2013

George G. Worthen

June 12, 2013

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Donated headstone dedicated in memory of Nathan Warren, freed slave and founding pastor of Bethel AME Church

On the morning of November 9, 2013, members of Bethel AME Church, the Masons, the Order of the Eastern Star, and the Mount Holly Cemetery Association gathered to celebrate the 150th birthday of Bethel AME Church and to dedicate a headstone marking the grave of its founding pastor Reverend Nathan Warren.

Dr. Sybil Jordan Hampton, Mount Holly board member, contributed the funds for the headstone.  She said" My brother Les and his wife Esther, along with Alfred and me decided to donate the headstone to honor my mother, Lorraine Jordan, who joined Bethel in 1932, at age 9.  It is neat to be able to honor Reverend Warren, Bethel AME on its 150th anniversary, and our mother with this gift." She also said, "We want the community to know that the cemetery is not a closed place and we want to build broader support for Mount Holly."

The Masons performed the traditional ceremony ensuring the marker’s installation according to Masonic tradition using the square, compass, level, plumb rule and trowel. To learn more about Nathan Warren, read the story posted in our blog section of this website.

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TALES OF THE CRYPT....
Susan Taylor Barham taught English at Parkview Arts and Science Magnet and was the original teacher that was contacted by the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program to start the "Tales of the Crypt" program at Mount Holly.  Knowing that Susan brought her students to Mount Holly Cemetery to read Edgar Lee Master's, "Spoonriver Anthology" the sexton told them that they might like to contact her.  She enlisted the support of Judy Goss, a creative writing teacher and theatre specialist at Parkview, and Fred Bussey to assist in the project.  Thinking we would be doing this as a one-time activity at first we plotted out twelve sites and solicited student performer-writers to assist.  Leigh contacted the Arkansas Arts Center and the costumer loaned her costumes that she brought and placed across a bench and told the performers to find something that would fit. The three hundred people that were expected turned into over twelve hundred and the evening lasted until about eleven o’clock rather than the eight-thirty expected finish time. The City of Little Rock accepted the project and it has now continued eighteen years and this past year was to be the first that Susan was not physically present. Even in 2012, when she was sick with her cancer, she made an appearance to the program she helped give birth to and loved dearly. What a wonderful legacy to Susan Taylor Barham’s creativity and commitment to education

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A special thank you to Grounds Chair Nancy Phillips and our Master Gardners who lovingly care for Mount Holly throughout the Spring, Summer and Fall.

This year TWENTY Master Gardners supported FORTY flowerbeds.  We appreciate you VERY much!!!

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PLEASE SCROLL DOWN TO SEE MORE OF THE BLOG
TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES CREATING SPACE BETWEEN ABOVE POST AND NEXT POST.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Friday, March 28th at 2:00 pm
The Public is Invited!


We will have a marker dedication on Friday, March 28th.  The marker is for Little Rock Chief of Police, George A. Counts who died in 1884 at the age of 35 years old.  For 130 years his grave has been unmarked.  Thanks to his Great-Grandson, Jim Counts, LR Chief of Police, Stuart Thomas and the Little Rock Police Department, his grave is now marked.  The LRPD will dedicate the marker on Friday, March 28th at 2:00 P. M.  The public is invited.


There is an interesting story "behind" the story.  Counts was nominated for the position of Chief of Police by Isaac Taylor Gillam, a former slave.  More can be found on the story on Encyclopedia of Arkansas.  Gillam had been a jailer and LR policeman as well.  

Chief Counts contracted tuberculosis in 1883 and had to resign his position.  He died in 1884.  According to our records he would have been a very young man of 29 years old when he was elected Chief of Police. 


Chief Counts was the Grandfather of Hollywood Actress, Eleanor Counts, whose grave at Mount Holly was marked last year by the Downtown Dames.  Her movies can be viewed via the Internet. 


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Founding Pastor of Bethel AME - Nathan Warren - gets headstone November 9, 2013

Click this link to see the news story
http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story/founding-pastor-of-bethel-ame-finally-gets-headstone/d/story/qR1H1T8EA0q3TO7w3Bcp-A#.UoBXYf9TANI.email




Little Rock Culture Vulture - May 23, 2013

Another noteable Arkansan buried at Mount Holly Cemetery, was discussed in the May 23, 2013 post by the Little Rock Culture Vulture.

LR Look Back: Mayor Thomas D. Merrick


I continue to enjoy being educated about the residents of Mount Holly Cememtery. Here is the link to his post.  I hope you will learn something new about one of the many veterans buried here in Little Rock at Mount Holly Cemetery.

http://lrculturevulture.com/2013/05/23/lr-look-back-mayor-thomas-d-merrick/

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Nathan Warren:
Free Man, Confectioner, Minister, and Civil Rights Advocate

by Anne Orsi

             The lot of a slave in the American South was not easy, no matter how well he or she was

treated by well-intentioned owners. Today it is hard for many of us to imagine being born into

bondage, not free to make our own decisions about where to live, whether to be educated,

whom to marry, and whether we can live with our families.

            Some slaves overcame their stifling beginnings, though, and became laudable examples of the kind of men and women their entire race should always have been allowed to be. Nathan Warren was one of these. Born into slavery, Nathan “Nase” Warren was a successful businessman, a minister, a devoted husband and father, a community organizer, and a civil rights activist. He is buried in a now-unmarked and lost grave at Mount Holly Cemetery.

            When Robert Crittenden came to Arkansas as the first Secretary and Acting Governor of the newly-created Arkansas Territory in 1819, he had a six year old slave called Nase. Some of Crittenden’s white descendants and some of Nathan’s black ones believe Crittenden, who was about 15 or 16 years older than his young slave, was the child’s father.

            In 1834, when Nathan was about 21 or 22 years old, Robert Crittenden died nearly bankrupt. Crittenden was only 37 years old when he died, and his widow had difficulty even keeping a roof over her head. This meant turmoil for young Nase, whose ownership was soon transferred to Daniel Greathouse, another Little Rock resident. But Greathouse filed an interesting document with the Pulaski County Clerk - after three and a half years of service, Nase was to be freed. Greathouse died before those three and a half years had expired, and Nase was indeed given his freedom just about the time that Arkansas became the 25th state to be admitted to the Union.

            Possibly because of his visibility in the Crittenden household, Nathan had made important contacts among other members of Arkansas’ territorial elite. Chester Ashley, one of the men who gave the land where the Mount Holly Cemetery sits to the City of Little Rock, was one of those contacts. Ashley hired Nathan as a carriage driver. Nathan and Anne, the quadroon daughter of the Ashley’s cook, married. They would have either nine or ten children together, and Nase would help to rear Anne’s older son, W.A. Rector.

            Nase was much more than an ordinary carriage driver, though. When he took over a confectionary two blocks from the Ashley’s home, on the land where part of the Capital Hotel now stands, the people of Little Rock quickly learned that he had a true gift for baking. His shop was so successful that the ladies of Little Rock would not consider having a party without treats from his store. They begged “Uncle Nase” for his secrets, but he refused, telling them that if he shared his recipes with white ladies, he would give away his trade.

            His confectionary was so successful that he eventually moved to a larger storefront west of Main Street. He suffered a setback when his shop burned. Arson was suspected. He reopened, though, and business continued briskly.

            Nathan was not the only member of his family to live free in the early 1800's. A brother who had remained with the Crittenden family in D.C. had also been freed, and together they purchased the freedom of a third brother from the Crittenden family in 1844.

            When Nathan’s first wife died, he married another Ashley slave, Mary Elizabeth. He had two daughters with her, and eventually purchased their freedom. The children from his first marriage remained slaves in the Ashley family, though.

            In the 1850's, sentiments against free black people ran high in southern states, and Arkansas was no exception. In 1859, Gov. Elias N. Conway signed the Free Negro Expulsion Act. Free black people, which meant anyone who had at least one black grandparent, were required to leave the state by January 1, 1860, or face sale into slavery for a period of one year. The continued freedom of about 700 people was directly jeopardized by this Act. Nathan was not among them, though. He was a very intelligent man, and when a similar measure had narrowly failed in the legislature in 1857, Nathan had seen the writing on the wall. He packed up Mary Eliza and their two free daughters and left for Xenia, Ohio, where he lived for several years. While he was in Ohio, he took the name Warren as a surname. At the time of the 1860 census, he lived in Xenia, Greene County, Ohio, with Mary Eliza, their daughters Ellen (8) and Ida (4), and two sons, William (2) and Edwin (7 months). As he had in Little Rock, Nathan worked as a baker.

            A story in a newspaper article about Nathan claimed that an old friend encountered him in New York during his exile, and that Nathan was miserably unhappy and down on his luck. The friend, a Mr. Tucker, brought Nathan back to Arkansas even though the Act expelling free black people was still in effect. Family legends dispute this version of events, though. Nathan’s Little Rock descendants believe that Nathan and his free family returned to Little Rock about 1863, possibly with the help or sponsorship of the Ashley family. Since Nathan had left behind nine or ten children, one can only assume that he missed them and worried about them as the country built up toward war. Perhaps local people had their hands full with politics and the war, or perhaps “Uncle Nase” was so well-liked that the society ladies were grateful for his return and persuaded their husbands to leave him alone. At any rate, Nathan reestablished his confectionary and his popularity.

            While living in Ohio, Nathan had been introduced to the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The AME church had broken away from the Methodist Church in Pennsylvania because black congregants wanted their own place of worship, independent from the white church. Almost as soon as he returned from Ohio, Nathan started the Bethel AME Church in Little Rock, and was ordained as a minister. The Bethel AME Church is still a vital part of the downtown community, although it has moved into a different building that takes up the block bordered by 16th Street and Wright Avenue between Izard and State Streets. It is celebrating its sesquicentennial this year.

            The year Nathan Warren started Bethel AME Church was a turning point not just in his life, but in the lives of all American slaves in rebellious states. The Emancipation Proclamation had been issued January 1 of that year, and Civil War raged across the country. Most of the battles fought in Arkansas occurred after January 1863, including the battles of Bayou Meto (also known as Reed’s Bridge) and Bayou Fourche, both of which were fought very close to Little Rock.

            With Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the rest of Nathan Warren’s family soon became free. Most of the children from his first marriage were adults now, and many of those ten children had inherited Nathan’s musical talent. Nathan was a popular fiddler, and his children played other instruments and performed publicly as a group.

            The end of the war brought other changes, too. Black people were no longer slaves and the government’s efforts at reconstruction in the southern states meant that black people would be granted rights. Exactly how those rights would be realized, and exactly how the former slaves would support themselves, was uncertain.  Nathan Warren was a Pulaski County delegate to the Convention of Colored Citizens held in Little Rock, November 30-December 2, 1865.  It was the first convention ever held by the black residents of Arkansas.

            The language contained in the minutes of that convention is stirring. The convention

met for the purpose of conferring with each other, as to our best interest and future prosperity; also, to memorialize the State Legislature and Congress of the United States, to grant us equality before the law, and the right of suffrage, ... we have earned it and, therefore, we deserve it; we have bought it with our blood, and, therefore, it is of priceless value to us.

 

            Rev. Warren delivered the prayer at the closing session the final day of the convention. The final resolutions of the convention underscored the great hope that the newly emancipated black Arkansans had, while recognizing that a struggle still lay before them.

The persecutions of two and a half centuries have not been enabled to destroy our confidence in the eventual justice of the American people. We believe the time has come when wisdom again asserts her sway in the councils of the nation.

 

            It would be another hundred years before the federal government would pass a civil rights act to ensure racial equality.

            Nathan maintained his confectionary and his musically-gifted children continued performing. Their musical gifts would bring them tragedy. In early 1866, the Warren family performers were hired to perform on the steamboat Miami on a journey between Little Rock and Memphis. In the early morning hours of January 28, 1866, the Miami was on its return to Little Rock. As the Miami navigated waters near the then-thriving town of Napoleon in Desha County, where the Arkansas empties into the Mississippi, its boilers exploded. Three of Nathan’s sons, George, Frank and John, were among the 225 killed, as was his son in law, Wash Phillips. Nathan’s son Isaiah and stepson W.A. Rector were on the boat, but survived the explosion.

            The Miami was one of three such tragedies in just a few days on America’s central waterways. Two days after the Miami’s explosion, the Missouri exploded, and two days after that, the W.R. Carter blew up. Around 365 lives were lost in the three explosions. The causes of the explosions on the Missouri and the W.R. Carter were never explained, but according to a report in the Cincinnati Enquirer on February 6, 1866, inspectors investigating the incident blamed the Miami tragedy on its engineers, who apparently were aware that the boilers needed repairs, but failed to maintain the boilers properly during the trip. The Atlantic and Mississippi Company, which owned all three of these steamboats as well as three others that had exploded in the preceding year, had no insurance coverage for its vessels. The Cincinnati Enquirer reported that the company’s managers had reasoned that it was cheaper to replace a boat now and then than it was to pay expensive insurance premiums on its entire fleet. A month to the day after the Miami tragedy, three more of the Atlantic & Mississippi’s steamboats were destroyed by fire near St. Louis. After losing nine steam boats - six within thirty days of each other - the company elected to insure its fleet.

            The Miami was lost during the most destructive four months in the history of America’s river navigation. It was one of twenty-nine steamboats destroyed by fire in the sixteen weeks between December 15, 1865 and April 12, 1866. 

              Despite this incredible personal tragedy, Nathan Warren continued to push for his own 

prosperity and for the prosperity of his race. Bethel AME Church grew exponentially, and

Nathan himself shepherded the flock there. On August 22, 1873, an article in the Arkansas

Gazette described efforts to form an organization designed to test the limits of the newly-enacted

Arkansas Civil Rights Law of 1873. Some believed the act was a sham and that the white people

of Arkansas had no intention of granting rights to black people. Nevertheless, a coalition of black

and white citizens met to devise ways in which the law’s purpose could be tested and fulfilled.

Nathan Warren attended, and was elected to the group’s finance committee.

         Nathan Warren’s name appears in minutes of other meetings during Reconstruction. He

was a civic leader, a minister, a successful businessman, and a civil rights activist. Despite

periods of great suffering, tragic setbacks, and loss, Nathan Warren persevered. His descendants

have every reason to be very proud of their notable ancestor.

         He died in 1888 at about the age of 76. He was a member of the Masonic Temple, and

was accorded Masonic rites at his funeral. He was buried at Mount Holly Cemetery.

The tragedies of Nathan Warren’s life did not end with his death, however. The civil

rights he wanted so much for himself and his family were to be tested in the fired of Jim Crow,

and at some point during those terrible years of racial inequity, tombstones of the graves of a

number of black residents at Mount Holly were vandalized and removed. The minutes of the

Mount Holly Cemetery Association are incomplete for dozens of years in the first half of the 20thcentury, and no one now has any memory of exactly what happened to the obelisk that had been

erected on Nathan Warren’s grave. Even the location of his grave has been lost to history.

         Next to his daughter Maria Rebecca Craigen, whose first husband Wash Phillips was

killed in the explosion of the Miami, is an empty space suitable for the erection of a replacement monument for Nathan Warren. Mount Holly hopes that eventually that space can be filled with a

fitting stone for a man who worked so hard against all odds for himself, his family, and his

community.

Information for this article was gleaned from two articles by Margaret Smith Ross published in the Arkansas Gazette and in the Historic Arkansas Quarterly, from records compiled by Tom Dillard and stored at the Arkansas Studies Institute’s Butler Center, from Bethel AME Church, and from online resources through the magic of Google. The author wishes to give special thanks to Nathan Warren’s 4th great-grandaughter, Shareese Kondo, for her gracious time and for family legends about her illustrious ancestor. 

 

 

 




Little Rock Culture Vulture - April 15, 2013

According to the Little Rock Culture Vulture blog, "The Pulitzer Prizes are to be announced today. Though Mt. Holly Cemetery touts that it is the site of a whole host of elected officials, it is also the only place in Arkansas where two Pulitzer Prize recipients are buried."  Thanks to his post, I have updated our information.  I am always excited to learn more about the residents of Mount Holly Cememtery.  Here is the link to his fascinating post.

http://lrculturevulture.com/2013/04/15/pulitzer-day-at-mt-holly/



KATV Daybreak Interview - March 23, 2013

On March 23, our very own Frances Jane Cranford was on Daybreak with Rene Shapiro to promote our cookbook & picnic. The link to the video is attached. Her interview is 10:22 from the beginning...if you want to fast forward to that spot in the attached video! Frances, thanks for getting up sooooo early to be there!

 http://www.katv.com/video?clipId=8690054&autostart=true



 



Mount Holly Cemetery is located at 1200 South Broadway, Little Rock, Arkansas

SCHOOL TOURS

It has been said that Mount Holly Cemetery is a city park for both the living and the dead.  One of many great aspects of life in the cemetery include the school tours given throughout the year by our volunteer tour guides.  This clever excerpt, about these tours, is taken from our Cookbook - RECIPES IN PERPETUITY - TIMELESS TASTES AND TALES FROM RESIDENTS AND FUTURE RESIDENTS OF MOUNT HOLLY (available on our bookstore page).

One of the most joyous events at Mount Holly is a tour of the cemetery by a group of school children.  This happens throughout the school year with classes coming from all over the state.  Students receive lessons in history, art, and respect for those who have gone before; and they often write thank you notes to the Mount Holly volunteer who has guided them through the cemetery.  They find the mausoleum “cool,” David O. Dodd’s grave interesting, and are fascinated by the story of the statues representing the two young sisters.  Sometimes their comments and the pictures they draw on their notes bring a smile to our faces.

“I never knew that there were so many ways to bury a dead body.”  “The mausoleum was also very cool.  I enjoyed walking in it and looking at how old people were when they died.”  “I have always enjoyed cemeteries; but Mount Holly has been the best I’ve been to by far. I mostly enjoyed the story of the two daughters who were made into statues.”  “I learned about the cremations buried under the water fountain.  It really makes me think about doing the same thing when I die.”  And finally: “Knowing that some important Arkansans are buried there makes Arkansas seem less lame.” 

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